Journal of Psychopharmacology study finds CBD helps inhibit methamphetamine consumption in rats

Journal of Psychopharmacology study finds CBD helps inhibit methamphetamine consumption in rats

November 16, 2018

A new study in the Journal of Psychopharmacology found that rats trained to self-administer methamphetamine were less likely to do so when treated with around 80 mg/kg of cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive component of cannabis.

“One focus of my laboratory is to understand the neurobiology of methamphetamine addiction so that we can discover effective treatments to reduce this burden on our society,” said study author Jennifer Cornish of Macquarie University. “Cannabinoids are showing promise as medications for a number of mental health disorders and symptoms in preclinical models, including drug addiction and relapse for opiates and psychostimulants.”

The preliminary findings suggest that CBD could be useful in fighting addiction to methamphetamine, one of the most abused drugs in the world.

“Methamphetamine is a psychostimulant, however the effect of cannabidiol had not yet been investigated for reducing reward or relapse in rats experienced at lever pressing for intravenous methamphetamine infusions,” Cornish went on. “As it is known that CBD acts on a number of targets in the brain that may impact on the pharmacology of methamphetamine use, this study was a logical next step for discovering more about methamphetamine addiction and the effects of CBD treatment.”

Motivation to consume sucrose, the chief component of sugar, was not impacted by the dosing the rats with CBD.

The whole study, “Cannabidiol treatment reduces the motivation to self-administer methamphetamine and methamphetamine-primed relapse in rats,” can be accessed on the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

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